1.28.2013

Home Speech Therapy Roundup

I've noticed for a while now, that Mason is having trouble articulating his /t/ and /s/ sounds, as well as pronouncing /i/ correctly, in the middle of a sentence. I was hoping he would grow out of it, but it seems he isn't. I've been planning to take him to the the elementary school to be assessed by a speech-language pathologist for the past month, but this winter has been tough on the immune system. We've both been sick with one thing or another since the beginning of December, and it feels like we'll be sick forever.

So I did some research and thanks to the wonders of Pinterest, I  found an amazing wealth of information online regarding speech therapy. While we're waiting for our immune systems to battle it out with our current illnesses, I'm going to try some things at home to see if we can make some progress. 

Here's a roundup of the best that I found:
Click the photos to be taken to each post.


Probably the most useful source, Mommy Speech Therapy goes into detail about the process of articulation therapy that she goes through. She also provides free downloads of worksheets you can use as support material to go along with it. This post was SO helpful in understand why each part of the process is important for the child to learn, and how to go about teaching it.

Communication Station's post helps you determine if your child is a 'tipper' or a 'dipper,' and explains the different ways you would teach 'tippers' or 'dippers' to make the /s/ sound.
Let's Grow Speech's post has good tips and exercises for getting kids to articulate the /s/ and /z/ sounds.

The Speech-Language Therapy Blog Posts group board on Pinterest is constantly updated by over 60 speech-language pathologists with links to their posts on the subject. It's a really good place for information.

Adventures in Speech Pathology has lots of articulation board games you can download, along with articulation cards, a list of language resources, and speech resources. There are games for all the sounds and blended sounds.

IF you happen to own an iPad (I don't), this Speech Tutor app by Pocket SLP is pretty cool. It has lots of video demonstrations that you can use to visibly show kids where their tongues should be placed to make the different sounds. I really wish it were available for Android!

From Speechy Musings, this list of freebies on Teachers Pay Teachers has lots of great games, activities, and other stuff for articulation and reinforcing (plus some for other parts of speech-language pathology).

I'm posting this one, even though it isn't free, because it was SUCH a find. Mason adores trains. This train articulation game is perfect for him!

This last one is an awesome reference list from Playing With Words 365, that includes links to posts on the different ages that children develop sounds, the difference between speech and language, definitions of speech terms, definition of different speech and language problems (stuttering, lisp, dysarthria, etc.), and things to watch out for.

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